Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg
Optimization in Robotics and Biomechanics

Modeling and Identification of Emotional Aspects of Locomotion

Martin Felis, Katja Mombaur - IWR

Alain Berthoz, Hideki Kadone - Laboratoire de Physiologie de la Perception et de l'Action, Coll├Ęge de France, Paris, France

The study of emotional facial expressions and of emotional body language is currently receiving a lot of attention in the cognitive sciences. In this project, we are not studying particular emotional gestures, but rather focus on the implicit bodily expression of emotions during standard motions such as walking forwards.

An underlying assumption of our work is that all human motion is optimal in some sense and that different emotions induce different objective functions, which result in different "deformations" of normal motion. Our analysis is based on whole-body dynamic models of the walking subjects as well as our previous work on generating complex locomotion by means of optimal control techniques and on the identification of human objectives by means of inverse optimal control.

The work is being performed in cooperation with the group of Prof. Alain Berthoz from the College de France in Paris, who is an expert on the perceptive and cognitive aspects of motion and is providing experimental data on walking motions in relation to different emotional conditions.

References:

G. Schultz, K. Mombaur: Modeling and Optimal Control of Human-Like Running, IEEE/ASME Transactions on Mechatronics, 2010.

 K. Mombaur, A. Truong, J.-P. Laumond: From Human to Humanoid Locomotion - An inverse optimal control approach, Autonomous Robots, Volume 28, Number 3 / April 2010 , published online 31 Dec. 2009.

M. Felis: Modellierung, Optimierung und Visualisierung menschlicher Gehbewegungen, diploma thesis, Heidelberg University, 2009

A. Berthoz (1997): The Brain's Sense of Movement, Harvard University Press.

K. Mombaur, orb@uni-hd.de
Last Update: 19.10.2011 - 16:03

The photographs in the header of this webpage have been taken at the Musee de l'Automate in Souillac, France